Daddy’s, Donuts, and Donations

Jeff Anderson’s book Plastic Donuts is a straightforward and simple format for investigating “giving that delights the heart of the Father.”  Anderson begins by showing the correlation between the simple and heartfelt gift from his eighteen-month-old daughter when she gives a plastic donut from her kitchen set to him.  She waits expectantly for his response and when he “eats” the donut with great animation, she is filled with such joy that it shone across her face and countenance.  She continued to bring “gifts” to her father as he continued to show his pleasure and approval.  That is the feeling that our Father experiences when we give simply and with heartfelt joy.

Now if that was the whole of his story, it would have been a very, very short book!  Granted his book is short, concise, and to the point, but he also visits the most frequent questions that one asks about tithing.  Some of those questions are:

  • What’s the “right” amount to give?
  • Does the tithe still apply to modern-era people?
  • Is the first 10 percent required, and everything else is a freewill offering?
  • What should be our motivations in giving?
  • Does it even matter what we give as long as we have good hearts?

The rest of the 115-page book is divided into chapter entitled:

  • What is acceptable (chapter 2)
  • Does the amount matter (chapter 3)
  • Rule #1: there are no rules (chapter 4)
  • A two-percent perspective (chapter 5)
  • Because you can (chapter 6)
  • All the difference (chapter 7)
  • That chair (chapter 8)

As the Apostle Paul wrote in Philippians 4:18, “I am humbly supplied, now that I have received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent.  They are a fragrant offering, and acceptable sacrifice, pleasing to God,” let our donations (offerings) be fragrant, acceptable, and pleasing to our Daddy in heaven.  He waits expectantly for our donuts!

For additional resources visit their website:  www.acceptablegift.org

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